Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED Lens

Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED Lens

If you’re a landscape photographer, chances are you use a wide angle lens quite frequently. Although standard and telephoto lenses are certainly useful for shooting landscapes, the wide angle is often the go-to lens. With that in mind, getting a good quality wide angle lens should be a priority when you are budgeting how much to spend on different lenses and accessories.

When it comes to choosing a wide angle lens to buy, the process can be quite confusing. There are so many options and a lot of different factors to consider. In this article we’ll highlight six of the best wide angle lenses for Nikon DSLRs. These are all quality lenses, although there are some significant differences between them. We’ll highlight some of the main strengths and weaknesses of each to help you with making your own decision.

You may be interested in other articles in this series:


The Best Wide Angle Lenses for Nikon

6. Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 24mm f/1.8G ED Lens

The AF-S NIKKOR 24mm f/1.8G ED is one of two prime lenses that we will feature on this list. The other four lenses are zooms. This is a quality lens with a wide angle, although it does not go ultrawide like the others on this list. The f/1.8 max aperture can help with shooting in low light and creating a shallow depth of field, although for landscape photography you will usually be ok with a lens that has a max aperture of f/4. It is also very lightweight at less than one pound.

  • For full frame or APS-C sensors
  • focal range: 24mm
  • aperture range: f/1.8 – f/16
  • vibration reduction: no
  • 72mm front filter diameter
  • weight: 12.52 oz.

 

Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 24mm f/1.8G ED Lens

Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 24mm f/1.8G ED Lens

5. Nikon AF NIKKOR 14mm f/2.8D ED Lens

This prime lens gives you an ultrawide angle and a maximum aperture of f/2.8. It is a high-quality lens with excellent sharpness. The downside is that the price is high. Also, you won’t be able to use standard screw-on filters because of the bulbous front element. It is a quality lens that could be a good choice if it meets your needs.

  • For full frame or APS-C sensors
  • focal range: 14mm
  • aperture range: f/2.8 – f/22
  • vibration reduction: no
  • no front filters
  • weight: 1.47 lbs.
Nikon AF NIKKOR 14mm f/2.8D ED Lens

Nikon AF NIKKOR 14mm f/2.8D ED Lens

4. Tokina AT-X 16-28mm f/2.8 Pro FX Lens

The Tokina 16-28mm f/2.8 is an excellent third party option. The range from 16-28mm provides some nice flexibility, and the maximum aperture of f/2.8 is also quite good. What many people will love about this lens is that it gives you a quality ultrawide angle lens at a very affordable price. The downsides, it is heavy at more than two pounds and does not offer vibration reduction. You also won’t be able to use standard screw-on filters with the bulbous front element.

  • For full frame sensors
  • focal range: 16-28mm
  • aperture range: f/2.8 – f/22
  • vibration reduction: no
  • no front filters
  • weight: 2.09 lbs.
Tokina AT-X 16-28mm f/2.8 Pro FX Lens

Tokina AT-X 16-28mm f/2.8 Pro FX Lens

3. Tamron SP 15-30mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Lens

The Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8 is probably the best third-party wide angle lens available. It offers excellent image quality and sharpness, with some good versatility going from an ultrawide 15mm to 30mm. Unlike the three lenses mentioned previously, this one does feature vibration reduction (Tamron calls it Vibration Compensation). The weight is one of the biggest negatives with this lens. Also, the bulbous front element prevents you from being able to use screw-on filters.

  • For full frame sensors
  • focal range: 15-30mm
  • aperture range: f/2.8 – f/22
  • vibration reduction: yes
  • no front filters
  • weight: 2.43 lbs.
Tamron SP 15-30mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Lens

Tamron SP 15-30mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Lens

2. Nikon AF-S FX NIKKOR 16-35mm f/4G ED Lens

The AF-S FX NIKKOR 16-35mm f/4G ED is our choice as the best Nikon wide angle lens for the money. It provides high-quality, sharp images. You’ll get a nice the ability to go ultrawide at 16mm all the way to 35mm. The weight is reasonable, and you’ll be able to use screw-on filters. It also features vibration reduction. The maximum aperture of f/4 is one of the few drawbacks, but for landscape photography that is typically more than sufficient. Another similar option is the Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED, which is a little cheaper but does not have vibration reduction.

  • For full frame or APS-C sensors
  • focal range: 16-35mm
  • aperture range: f/4 – f/22
  • vibration reduction: yes
  • 77mm front filter diameter
  • weight: 1.5 lbs.
Nikon AF-S FX NIKKOR 16-35mm f/4G ED Lens

Nikon AF-S FX NIKKOR 16-35mm f/4G ED Lens

1. Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED Lens

The AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED is our choice as the highest-quality wide angle lens for Nikon.  The downside is that is costs significantly more than the 16-35mm f/4, which is why we named that one the best for the money. The 14-24mm f/2.8 offers the highest-quality images and sharpness. You’ll be able to go ultrawide with the range from 14-24mm, and the max aperture of f/2.8 is more than enough for landscape photographers. Aside from the price, this one does have some other downsides. First, it is heavy at more than 2 pounds, although not quite as heavy as the Tamron 15-30mm. Also, this lens does not feature vibration reduction, and with the bulbous front you won’t be able to use screw-on filters.

  • For full frame or APS-C sensors
  • focal range: 14-24mm
  • aperture range: f/2.8 – f/22
  • vibration reduction: no
  • no front filters
  • weight: 2.2 lbs.
Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED Lens

Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED Lens

How to Choose the Right Wide Angle Lens for You

All six of the lenses shown here are excellent options, and you really can’t go wrong with any of them. The choice comes down to your needs, and, of course, your budget. The Tokina 16-28mm f/2.8 is the lowest-priced option and still a very good lens. If your budget is tight, it could be an excellent choice.

On the other hand, if you are able to go up in price a bit, the NIKKOR 16-35mm f/4 offers better overall quality. For most amateurs the NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8 exceeds the budget, but if you are able to afford it, it is a top-of-the-line lens.

Aside from price, also consider the focal range. How wide do you need to go? Do you need a zoom lens? The NIKKOR 24mm f/1.8 and the NIKKOR 14mm f/2.8 are excellent prime lenses.

Weight and bulkiness is another factor. If you do a lot of traveling or hiking the weight of the lens is something to consider. The NIKKOR 24mm f/1.8 is easily the lightest option listed here. The Tokina 16-28mm f/2.8, the Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8, and the NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8 are on the heavier side, and can increase your load if you are hiking long distances.

Is vibration reduction important to you? If so, the Tamron 15-30mm and the NIKKOR 16-35mm f/4 are the only options listed here that come with vibration reduction. If you do the majority of your shooting from a tripod this may not matter to you.

How wide do you want to go? All of the lens here will give you a nice wide angle, but there is a big difference between 14mm and 24mm.

In the end, you need to see which lens fits your needs and your budget the best.

Are you a Canon user? See our Reviews of the Best Wide Angle Lenses for Canon DSLRs.